Free : Crochet Patterns

Bacon Strips Pattern

My friend asked me to whip her up a couple pieces of bacon.  Her only requirement was that they be about four inches long.

This is my pattern, using American crochet terms.  It is a simple beginner’s project.

I made this bacon using I Love This Yarn acrylic in cranberry and antique white, using a G (4.25mm) hook.

Starting with the cranberry yarn, I chained enough stitches to get me the four inches of length I needed.  You can make you bacon longer or shorter, as you will.

For strip A, I dropped and cut the cranberry yarn, leaving a short tail to weave in later.  I picked up the white, turned my work, chain one stitch, and then began to single crochet (SC) into the back loop of every stitch to the end of the row.

I worked one more row of white, before cutting the yarn, leaving a short tail for later, and changed to the cranberry.  I repeated the same thing: chain one, SC through the back loop of every stitch.

I continued using the cranberry for one more row before fastening off.

Weave in your ends and you are done.

For strip B, I did the same thing, but I changed up the color changes a bit.

Two rows of cranberry, followed by one row of antique white, then two rows of cranberry.

The basic pattern is: chain your foundation row.  SC through the back loop into the second stitch from the hook.  Turn.  Chain 1 stitch.  SC through the back loop of every stitch.

You can make your piece of bacon as long and as wide as you’d like.  You can add more white rows, or not.  It is all up to you.

Enjoy.

 

 

 

Bacon Head Warmer Pattern

This pattern is strictly for the headband.  Not the fried eggs.  I did not design nor did I create the pattern for the fried eggs.  I used this pattern to make the fried eggs.

Now, what I know about crochet could fit inside a thimble, so if I get something wrong or if something is unclear, please let me know.

I use American crochet terms here.  This pattern requires you be able to create a simple chain, as well as being able to single crochet (SC) through the back loop.  Basic sewing skills are needed at the end of the project.

Here’s the pattern, as I know it.

This sample is knit using I Love This Yarn acrylic yarn, which Hobby Lobby carries.  The colors I used were cranberry and antique white.

I used a G hook (4.25 MM).

I started with the cranberry.

I didn’t have the person for whom this headband was made in my possession…so I fudged and used my own head.  I crocheted a chain stitch as long as my head is around, measuring it against where the headband would sit once it was done.  Now, I made sure that both ends touched, but just barely.  When you do this part, it might seem as if the headband will be too tight.  Once you start working stitches into the chain, you will gain a bit of ease.  This headband is a snug fit.  If you would like a looser fit, or if you have a bigger head to fit, just add some more chain stitches until you are happy.

After creating the chain, I SC into the second stitch from the hook, through the back loop.  I repeated this down the length of the chain, SC through the back loop of the stitch, still using cranberry.

Here I cut the yarn, leaving a tail a couple inches long for weaving in later.  I picked up the antique white, chained one stitch, then began to SC through the back loop into every single stitch the length of the row.

I did this for four rows.

Then I cut the white yarn, leaving a tail a couple inches long for weaving in later, and picked up the cranberry again.

I chained one stitch, then proceeded to work a SC into the back loop of every stitch for the length of the row.

I repeated this row again, in cranberry.

Then I switched to the antique white.  Following the same formula: chain 1, SC through the back loop of every stitch…I worked in white for two rows.  Then I switched to the cranberry and worked in the same manner for four rows.  I cut the yarn, and finished the last stitch off.

Using the tails from the yarns, I united the two separate ends of the head warmer to make it into a continuous circle.  I sewed the white sections together using white yarn tails.  I sewed the red sections using red yarn tails.

I then finished weaving in all the ends.

Voila…head warmer all done.

 

Basic Head Warmer Pattern

The sample above was made using I Love This Yarn acrylic, using a J hook (6mm).  I used antique white for this project.

This is a very simple beginner’s project–otherwise, I wouldn’t have been able to manage it myself.  The pattern below is given using American crochet terms.  If I am unclear, or if I mess something up, please let me know and I will do my best to correct things.

I didn’t have the person for whom this headband was made in my possession…so I fudged and used my own head.  I crocheted a chain stitch as long as my head is around, measuring it against where the headband would sit once it was done.  Now, I made sure that both ends touched, but just barely.  When you do this part, it might seem as if the headband will be too tight.  Once you start working stitches into the chain, you will gain a bit of ease.  This headband is a snug fit.  If you would like a looser fit, or if you have a bigger head to fit, just add some more chain stitches until you are happy.

I skipped the first stitch in the chain and began working by working a SC (single crochet) into the second stitch from the hook.  I SC into every stitch of the row.  Turn your work.  Chain one stitch.  Work a SC into every stitch of the row.

Repeat that pattern for as many rows as you like. The sample here has five rows, although I did make another, wider one for another friend that was ten rows wide.

When your headband is as wide as you would like it, finish the row, cut your yarn leaving yourself a good six inches or so for a tail, then finish off the last stitch.

Using the tail, sew the two sides of your headband together to form a circle.  I don’t use any really fancy method here.  I just try to make it look tidy.

Once you are done, weave in your tail.  Voila.  All done.

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